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Honey Harvesting

In early spring the weather begins to warm and the star shaped blossom of the Manuka begin to unfurl. It’s a beautiful scene as miles of green become speckled with white and pink and it doesn’t take long for our honeybees to be drawn to the magical Manuka flower. Manuka honey begins as nectar collected by the bees, as they forage from flower to flower. They use their long, tubelike tongues to suck the nectar out of the flowers, which is stored in their stomachs and carried to the beehive. While inside the bee's stomach the nectar mixes with the proteins and enzymes produced by the bees, converting it into honey. The bees then drop the honey into the beeswax...

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Yotam Ottolenghi's Lentils, Radicchio and Walnuts with Mānuka honey

Reposted from an article on The Guardian.Recipe & words by Yotam OttolenghiPhotograph by Colin Campbell for the Guardian I got a thorough introduction to manuka on a recent trip to New Zealand, where it features regularly on menus and in cocktails. Apart from its famous healing properties, manuka has a strong, woody flavour. Still, it is rather expensive, so you can substitute it with another good, strong honey. Radicchio's bitterness balances the rich sweetness of the honey, but if it's not your thing, leave it out. Serves four. 200g puy lentils2 bay leaves100g manuka honey¼ tsp flaked chilli½ tsp ground turmericSalt and black pepperAbout 1 tsp water3 tbsp red-wine vinegar90ml olive oil100g walnuts½ medium-size radicchio60g pecorino fiore sardo, or other mature ewe's...

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Why Keihls turned to NZ Mānuka honey for their skincare

When Kiehl's and L'Oreal luxury brands wanted the finest premium Manuka as a key ingredient for new product additions to their range they chose Watson & Son. To support the new product launch Kiehl's invited over 80 journalists from publications around the world for a day at the Watson & Son facilities. They all received exclusive access to the honey process, tasted honey, experience the Watson & Son difference and even interacted with beehives. Read Article

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On Location: The East Cape

Driftwood fringed beaches just up against towering cliffs and deserted roads. Spectacular vistas lie around every corner. This is the East Cape. It was here that Captain Cook landed back in the 18th century, and it was also here that some of the first Māori wakas (canoes) landed over eight hundred years ago. New Zealand was one of the last habitable landmasses on earth to remain unpeopled until the arrival of our ancestors. Māori Land Ownership Our partnerships with other Māori landowners are very important to Oha. Traditionally, Māori land was occupied rather than ‘owned’. Ahi-kā-roa in Māori means the long-burning fires of occupation. If a group was strong enough to defend themselves against challenges they could keep their fires...

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